D. Scott Fischer CFP® CAP®

Retirement Planning Specialist
Managing Partner
(469) 429-9292 ext 201

Scott graduated with his Bachelor of Science degree in Finance and Economics from the University of Texas at Dallas in 2005 and immediately joined Equitable Advisors. He graduated from the company sponsored Institute at Harvard in 2014, a specialized training program in finance and asset allocation. In 2017, Scott attended The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania to earn the supplemental title of Retirement Planning Specialist. Scott is also a Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy® (CAP®) to help guide his clients through the best possible charitable giving strategies and maximize their philanthropic impact.

Having started investing in the stock market at age thirteen, there was never a doubt that I would become a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional, CFP®. Investing at that young age, I got to quickly experience the tech boom and bust as a teenager. Growing up in Houston, I also had a front-line view of “too big to fail” Enron. These were expensive lessons but quite valuable. Most would say I’m an “old soul” and a lot of that is the result of being very close with my grandparents. They are a shining example of what a long and happy marriage can be having just celebrated their 75th wedding anniversary at 99 years old. My grandparents instilled in me the importance of many things; including good manners in everyday life and especially in the way you act and speak to others. My grandparents grew up during the depression and there has been one memory that has stuck with me that truly sums up my grandfather’s wisdom. As a treat, we would stop at McDonald’s to grab a hamburger. I always wanted a cheeseburger and, like most kids, I did not like onions on my burger. My order was always a plain hamburger with no substitutions or changes. It was ten cents to add cheese and my grandfather could add a slice of cheese at home for much cheaper. As far as the onions, McDonald’s wasn’t going to subtract ten cents off the price so that would be wasteful. Now, as much as I preferred the cheese from McDonald’s and disliked onions, I couldn’t argue with the logic.

I was a born saver, as a kid if I was given a couple bucks to buy candy or a souvenir on a trip, it went straight into the pocket for another day. There was always this allure of accumulating money to create a nest egg from a young age. To me, liquidity meant opportunity and options whether it was going to be to buy my first car or rent an apartment when my siblings were being annoying.

I enjoy several hobbies which include playing soccer, fishing, cooking, being a master gardener, slowly learning the piano, and coaching my kid’s sports teams. Community involvement is also very important to me. I serve on several non-profit boards both now as in the past.